Posts Tagged ‘Webkit’

CSS Counters: Counter-Increment and Friends

CSS, WebKit | Posted by Keefr January 29th, 2014

Old browsers often keep us from using the latest and greatest cause of older browser lacking support. We read about cool concepts, but rarely get to put them into practice.

Lately, I’ve been doing a lot of development that’s specific to Mobile Safari / Webkit and had a case recently that had an ordered list where the design called for the numerals to be a different color and style than the text of the ordered list.

Normally, I’d have to add extra markup, such as a span tag inside the <li>. But with the opportunity of not having to target anything but Webkit, why not utilize a CSS counter and a before pseudo element for a bit cleanup markup?

Thanks to the article below as a refresher, I did just that.

CSS Counters: Counter-Increment and Friends

Google’s Blink Team Pulls 8.8 Million Lines of WebKit Code in One Month

Browsers, Chrome, WebKit | Posted by Keefr June 26th, 2013

A friend and co-worker just sent this to me. Talk about optimizing your code — nearly 9 million lines of code should help speed things up a tad.

Google’s Blink Team Pulls 8.8 Million Lines of WebKit Code in One Month

WebKit Releases New SunSpider 1.0 Benchmark to Chart the Future of JavaScript Performance

JavaScript, WebKit | Posted by Keefr May 2nd, 2013

Benchmarks are all over the place, but the interesting bit about this one is that this one is really spurred by Google forking the Webkit project, making its own spinoff called “Blink,” which allows it to separate itself from Apple’s Nitro JS processor, which Chrome doesn’t utilize.

Samsung (and others) end up as the odd men out though, as it uses the Apple WebKit Engine, but Chrome’s V8 JS engine. Things could get interesting going forward if these forks… well fork more.

WebKit Releases New SunSpider 1.0 Benchmark to Chart the Future of JavaScript Performance

WebKit Monoculture

Browsers, WebKit | Posted by Keefr April 11th, 2013

Nice writeup (of a writeup) on how WebKit monoculture (Chrome, Safari, Opera and their mobile counterparts, along with some other lesser used browsers) all having WebKit as their underlying structure.

WebKit Monoculture

300 Million Users and Move to WebKit

Browsers, WebKit | Posted by Keefr February 13th, 2013

It turns out that Opera is coming over to the same core that powers Chrome and Safari — WebKit. This is great for web standards, and great for the WebKit project, as the Opera developers will now be contributing to that open source project as well.

Hat tip, Ben. I echo his sentiment. Who knew Opera had 300 million users?

300 Million Users and Move to WebKit